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are being smaller and one way you do that as is this idea of having crews fly from the united states to overseas operating theaters to replace each other to a policy sometimes called cruise swaps or think swaps. it's hard to do and in fairness to the navy it's already been done on some ships and in fairness to the navy so i think that's the kind of idea that needs to be expanded and generalize because we need more innovative ways of using late lamented -- limited sources of what we are to have. >> going forward regardless of who is president the administration may change but the math remains the same. there are some hard fiscal issues they will have to deal with an and defense is going to have hard strategic choices and i look forward to getting past the election when we can see whatever administration is in charge and what they start to do in terms of making the strategic choices but the longer you wait the tougher the decisions get. this idea that both sides are pursuing, setting a particular budget target and saying that is what we are going to stick to and fill in the strategy be
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
that threatens the very viability of the united states senate. last july the obama administration used the flimsiest of arguments, granted themselves the authority to waive federal welfare work requirements. and whether or not what they, the obama administration intends to accomplish with these waivers is good welfare policy has been the subject of robust debate. i'm not here to argue the merits or lack thereof of the underlying welfare policy goals of the obama administration. what i am here to do is to make a plea to my fellow senators, as senators we simply cannot let this action stand. if we fail to stand together as senators in defense of our constitutional duty to be the ones to draft legislation, we might as well pack up our bags and go home, because we will have opened the door for this administration and future administrations to unilaterally decide they can waive precedent, congressional intent, and actual legislative language as senators have scrupulously debated and compromised on. if we do not stand together as the united states senate, we will be ceding our authority to t
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., september 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the senate is now considering the motion to proceed to s. 3547, the veterans job corps act. 70 minutes will be equally divided this morning between the two leaders or their designees with the republicans controlling the first half and the majority controlling the final half. we'll begin consideration of veterans jobs bill today. it's unfortunate that we're having to go through all this, another couple of filibusters on this bill. but th
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
's got the authority of the president of the united states to make decisions, and to coordinate this across the sectors. there's no single government agency that has the ability, the capacity to respond to this or to work this. people talk about nsa all the time, and general alexander i think is a real patriot is someone who cares about this country and he's got great capability, but that is one piece of the solution. somebody needs to coordinate that across the entire, the whole of government, and that, regardless of the administration come in my opinion, is going to be the best step forward for us to take after november. >> i used to joke when asked this question that there is no single department or agency that has what we call title vii date authority. you know, that is 10, 18 and 50 that can actually approach the cyber domain. so, and you look at the approach we are taking, it has to be a joint effort marshaling all of the authorities and responsibilities of the federal government rings to bear. in addition to leveraging the capabilities the private sector that has a unique
the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 19, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 499, s. 3521, which is the tax extenders legislation reported out of the finance committee previously. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 4, s. 3521, a bill amend the internal revenue code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions. mr. reid: madam president, following my remarks and those of my distinguishe
the. he served forty-third solicitor general of the united states from june of 2005 until june of 2008. prior to the conversation of solicitor general he served as acting solicitor general for nearly a year, as deputy solicitor general for three years and seven years of service is the longest period of continuous service, in the nineteenth century. he argued 16 cases before the supreme court including the case with which we began this conference today. mr clement received his bachelor's degree from shore -- storage town university service and master's degree in economics from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school as supreme court editor of harvard law review. following graduation, and the u.s. court of appeals. and he went on to serve seat chief counsel of the subcommittee on the constitution and property rights is subject today is intriguing lead in title october term 2011, a constitutional moment. please welcome paul clement. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. great to see the cato institute. is an honor to be here at the podium presenting some th
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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